Photography: the wild cliffs of the Malabar Headland

This is seriously the wildest scenery along all of the Sydney coastline. You’re in the middle of a large city, and there is nothing except cliffs and bushes. Of course the Malabar Headland is known for the sewerage treatment plant, but since that is now all covered and treated an pumped out to sea, there is no smell or there is nothing much left there in the way of infrastructure.

To get to the headland, you can either follow the path from the very south end of Maroubra Beach, or take the little path that starts at the car park at the end of Fisherman’s Road. At this place, there is a fence, but someone cut a giant hole in it a long time ago, and the track that continues on the other side is clear.

The headland from Long Bay.

Malabar headland December 2014-1

Last year, I photographed this bunker from the golf course on other side of the bay. I thought it was the funky bunker that sits on the rocks south of Maroubra beach, but I worked out that it has to be a different one.

Malabar headland December 2014-2

Here is proof: there are two funky bunkers.

Malabar headland December 2014-3

The cairn at the headland’s highest point.

Malabar headland December 2014-5

View to Maroubra, Bondi (the tall buildings) and the city.

Malabar headland December 2014-6

There are some really serious cliffs along this part of the coast.

Malabar headland December 2014-7

Some Pimelea flower that I’ve never seen before and I’m too lazy to identify right now.

Malabar headland December 2014-11

Photography: the wild cliffs of the Malabar Headland was originally published on Must Use Bigger Elephants

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2 comments on “Photography: the wild cliffs of the Malabar Headland

  1. Hi Patty

    The ” funky bunker” in your photograph at Boora Point is a searchlight post. North of the bunker there are two gun emplacements and further north again at Magic Point there is another searchlight post.

    The searchlights and guns date from World War II. The searchlights were to scan the ocean for invading Japanese vessels and illuminate them for the guns to fire at.

    All the best.

    Peter

    • Thank you for responding.

      One of the amazing things about the two structures at the points is that you can barely see them from the land, especially the one that’s south of Maroubra. If you just walk past,you would never even know that it’s there.

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