Don’t kill yourself over daily word counts

In the three year plan that is the foundation of my self-publishing books, I mentioned the example of writing 1000 words per day to achieve a publishing speed of four novels year.

But this is assuming that you write relatively clean fiction.

How many words do you really need to write per day in order to publish successfully?

Some people write huge amounts, like more than 3000 words a day. Is this necessary, is it feasible, and how do you do it?

I don’t write that much. I find, and a lot of people share that feeling with me, that I simply don’t have enough material that is ready to be written to produce that many words each day on a consistent basis. It’s not that I can’t write words, it’s that deciding which words I need to write requires more time. If I write words, I want them to be words that count and words that have resonance.

I hate writing words for words’ sake. I will bash out a framework of a story and will then spend several read-throughs adding little bits of emotional or informational language where they are needed. I need time to think about how I’m going to do this, and can’t do it when I don’t already have something written.

My story editor can attest to the fact that my first drafts are always extremely underwritten.

When I started publishing, I wrote a lot more than I do currently, but one of the things I have learned is to write more efficiently. I hardly ever delete any scenes or large numbers of words.

In fact, I consider myself a perfect example why you can still publish a lot of books per year without a huge daily word count.

Yet, a lot of the focus in advice on how to publish more quickly centres on actual words on the paper. That you need to “train your writing muscles” and other things that completely rub me up the wrong way.

You do not need to write 5000 words a day to have a writing career. You need to know where your story is going and you need to be confident that you have control of the story structure, to not let it meander in useless directions (that you will then have to cut out). You need to get to know your characters well enough so that you don’t have them doing things that would be—well—out of character. You need to know the setting well enough so that you don’t have something happening that’s inconsistent with the worldbuilding and that you’ll have to fix later.

It’s not about written words. It’s about finished words. If you write 500 finished words a day, you’re way ahead of someone who writes 3000 words but then has to spend months agonising over a revision.

It’s not about written words. It’s about how well you know the story and how you can shape and deepen it in a subsequent draft, rather than having to cut huge chunks.

This comes with experience. Your first book is likely to take you ages and you are likely to have to cut big chunks.

Focus less on the number of written words, and more on the story you’re telling. If you’re like me and find word counts useless or depressing, but you want to measure progress, measure it in scenes. Give yourself one or more scenes to write each day, then give yourself one or more chapters to edit later.

The comments on this blog are closed, but this post is syndicated to my Facebook page, where you can comment and ask further questions. Find more information about the Three-year plan self-publishing books here.

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